Late Summer/Early Fall Roasted Veggies from ZOOM Cooking Class on 9/24/21

Early last week I reviewed Serving Up the Harvest by Andrew Chesman on www.menupause.info.  (Put the cookbook name in the SEARCH box in the lower right hand corner of my Home Page.) I have included as many of the items from her list in the cookbook that I liked or were available, with the emphasis on fresh and organic. Since this is a cooking by the strings-of-your apron recipe, feel free to add or subtract items you dislike & use more or less of the items to your taste and appetite. I also added spices & other items I use in my cooking, like garlic and ginger.

P.S. I had planned on doing a separate posting on diet and menopause, since September is Menopause Awareness Month, but I realize that the most important piece of information I have learned about food and menopause is to eat an alkalizing diet, which means mostly plant-based, since meat, dairy, grains and beans are for the most part, acidifying. So I recommend that you subscribe to www.saveourbones.com and check out Vivian Goldschmidt’s excellent information and alkalizing dishes. (I plan to review her e-book, Bone Appetite and will continue to create plant-based recipes that reflect more alkalizing ingredients. Also,if you GOOGLE Menopause Awareness Month, you will find more information about this natural process for women. Menopause is not a disease, so instead of calling these changes symptoms, I just call them changes and we can adjust our diets, exercises, and behavior to adapt gradually to these changes and move into PMZ, post-menopausal zest!

Enjoy!

Late Summer Early Fall Roasted Veggies over Fresh Greens


          Ingredients (Organic preferred)

Veggies:

Purple eggplant (salted for 10 minutes, rinsed and patted dry)
Bell Pepper (red, yellow or orange)
Fennel bulb
Okra or zucchini
Sweet Potato
Leek or Onion
*Corn Kernels (optional)
Fresh Greens (I used Org. Spring Mix)

Oil & Spices:
Garlic, Ginger, Curry powder or other spices of your choice
Avocado Oil (Spray or toss with the oil)
Salt (optional)

* I could not find organic corn (even though it is on the Clean 15, I wanted organic), so I purchased org. corn kernels in a can with no BPA lining and no GMO corn.  (Go to the Environmental Working Groups’s www.ewg.org for the Dirty Dozen and Clean Fifteen list of foods.)

 

Directions:

  1. Make sure all the vegetables are washed well and dried. (They roast better if they are not wet. Place pieces directly on cookie sheet, lightly oiled, as you wash and cut them.)
  2. Slice the salted, rinsed and dried eggplant into bite-sized chunks or slices.
  3. Slice bell pepper and remove white veins and seeds and slice or cut small chunks into bite-sized pieces.
  4. Slice fennel into strips.
  5. Slice zucchini into bite-sized pieces or cut okra pods in half.
  6. Slice sweet potato and leek/onion thinly.
  7. Add 1-2 sliced garlic and ginger pieces and any spices you are using and toss with veggies. Add oil and toss again, adding salt if you choose to.
  8. Place the tray in the oven and turn on broil. Broil for about 5 minutes and then turn veggies over. Broil another 5 minutes or to desired crispness. The closer the tray is to the broiler, the less time you need, so I check my veggies every 3 or 4 minutes to be sure they aren’t burning. (*If using corn, add during the last part of the grilling.
  9. Remove broiled veggies from cookie sheet and place on a bed of fresh, organic greens washed & dried, tossed with a dressing of your choice. (Or serve over cooked quinoa or rice that you start to make before you broil/roast the veggies.)

NOTES: Keep in mind that the veggies shrink, so what may look like a lot on the tray will be reduced to about 1/2 to ¾ of what you started with. This dish can be served hot or cold. I usually make enough to have them hot over the greens for dinner and then the next day toss them into my lunch or dinner salad, both chilled, adding some dressing.

P.S. For a complete meal in a dish, I add roasted tofu on a tray below the cooking sheet for the vegetables. The tofu can also be served hot or cold, tossed with some tamari soy sauce (Tamari is made without wheat).  If you are not a vegetarian, feel free to add cooked chicken or fish.

Also, this class fell on Succoth, my favorite Jewish holiday when an outdoor booth (sukkah) is decorated with fruits & veggies!

Very fitting!

 

My ZOOM Cooking Class

My second Zoom cooking class is tomorrow, August 14th @ 1 pm est.

Here is the link. I hope you can join me for one hour. The topic is acid/ alkaline diet and the recipe is Roasted Veggies. I have a couple recipes in Kitchen Nutrition with recipes, so on this posting I am listing plant foods that are sources of protein for those concerned about this issue. (See below*)

My motto for my classes is: The Good Taste of Health

Judy Ringold is the hostess and I am doing the cooking.

Join Zoom Meeting:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89407280194

Meeting ID: 894 0728 0194
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*High Protein Vegetables   

https://www.gardenguides.com/88079-fruits-vegetables-high-protein.html

Getting adequate protein is difficult for vegetarians. Fruits & vegetables mostly do not contain the same amounts of protein as meat does. (Most fruits have little protein and the fruits with the highest protein content have only a little more than 1 g. Vegetables, however, can have as much as 28 g.)

Alfalfa Seeds are sprouted and consumed for their 1.3 g. Sprout alfalfa seeds by soaking them in water and rinsing them periodically until the young alfalfa plants decide to pop out of the seeds.

Artichoke: Cook, boil and drain artichokes. Eating them provides 4.18 g of protein.

Asparagus: Regardless of whether it is canned, cooked, frozen or raw, asparagus contains a hearty amount of protein, with four spears giving 1.54 g.

Avocados: One ounce of raw avocado contains 0.6 g of protein. Avocados have a distinct taste that can liven up salads.

Beans: Beans are notorious for being important sources of protein. One cup of beans can have anywhere from 12 to 17 g.

Peas: Split peas are another protein-loaded food, with a cup of split peas containing 16.35 g. Split peas also have a lot of fiber and are beneficial for the heart. Green peas have around 8 g of protein.

Beets: One cup of beet greens has 3.7 g of protein. Beets themselves contain 0.84 g.

Banana: Bananas have a high protein content compared to other fruits, with a cup of bananas containing 1.22 g.

Blackberries: Blackberries are another fruit that has a healthy dose of protein. Blackberries contain 1 g per cup.

Brussels sprouts are an excellent source of protein, and just 88 grams (g), or 1 cup raw (Source: www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/284765)

Corn: Corn contains around 5 g of protein per 1-cup serving.

Lentils: Lentils are some of the most protein-packed vegetables around, with 1 cup of lentils containing almost 18 g. Lentils are also significant sources of fiber, fantastic for the heart and provide more iron than most other vegetables.

Other vegetables with protein include: broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, cucumbers, garlic, lettuce, mushrooms, onions, parsley, peppers, potatoes, pumpkins, radishes, spinach, squash, sweet potatoes and tomatoes. Fruits that contain protein are apples, apricots, blueberries, cherries and grapefruit.  (Also chick peas and quinoa are good sources.)

Also, chia seeds: ‘Complete’ proteins are protein foods that contain all the essential amino acids in the right proportion for human health. Many plant foods do not provide complete protein: for example, most grains are lacking in lysine, and most beans and pulses are low in methionine. This means that we need to eat other foods that are rich in that missing amino acid, to make up the deficit. But chia seeds do have all of those vital amino acids.
From: www.superfoodUK.com.

Here is a reprint from the ‘Net as to why eating lower on the food chain is a great idea:

 

  • Environmental Stewardship – Eat lower on the food chain …

    environment.worcesterdiocese.org/eatlower-on…

    Eat lower on the food chain. There are health benefits as well as environmental benefits when we are eating lower on the food chain. To name a few of these health benefits, they include reducing heart disease, limiting cancer risks, and improving your diet. In terms of environmental benefits, producing fruits and vegetables requires less energy and water than most meat.

 

Finally, there’s a video my friend Krista told me to watch, which I plan to do:

the film that environmental organizations don’t want you to see!  “Cowspiracy may be the most important film made to inspire saving the planet.”— Louie Psihoyos, Oscar-Winning Director of “The Cove” “ A documentary that will rock and inspire the environmental movement.