Posts Tagged ‘tomatoes’

My ZOOM Cooking Class

Thursday, August 13th, 2020

My second Zoom cooking class is tomorrow, August 14th @ 1 pm est.

Here is the link. I hope you can join me for one hour. The topic is acid/ alkaline diet and the recipe is Roasted Veggies. I have a couple recipes in Kitchen Nutrition with recipes, so on this posting I am listing plant foods that are sources of protein for those concerned about this issue. (See below*)

My motto for my classes is: The Good Taste of Health

Judy Ringold is the hostess and I am doing the cooking.

Join Zoom Meeting:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89407280194

Meeting ID: 894 0728 0194
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*High Protein Vegetables   

https://www.gardenguides.com/88079-fruits-vegetables-high-protein.html

Getting adequate protein is difficult for vegetarians. Fruits & vegetables mostly do not contain the same amounts of protein as meat does. (Most fruits have little protein and the fruits with the highest protein content have only a little more than 1 g. Vegetables, however, can have as much as 28 g.)

Alfalfa Seeds are sprouted and consumed for their 1.3 g. Sprout alfalfa seeds by soaking them in water and rinsing them periodically until the young alfalfa plants decide to pop out of the seeds.

Artichoke: Cook, boil and drain artichokes. Eating them provides 4.18 g of protein.

Asparagus: Regardless of whether it is canned, cooked, frozen or raw, asparagus contains a hearty amount of protein, with four spears giving 1.54 g.

Avocados: One ounce of raw avocado contains 0.6 g of protein. Avocados have a distinct taste that can liven up salads.

Beans: Beans are notorious for being important sources of protein. One cup of beans can have anywhere from 12 to 17 g.

Peas: Split peas are another protein-loaded food, with a cup of split peas containing 16.35 g. Split peas also have a lot of fiber and are beneficial for the heart. Green peas have around 8 g of protein.

Beets: One cup of beet greens has 3.7 g of protein. Beets themselves contain 0.84 g.

Banana: Bananas have a high protein content compared to other fruits, with a cup of bananas containing 1.22 g.

Blackberries: Blackberries are another fruit that has a healthy dose of protein. Blackberries contain 1 g per cup.

Brussels sprouts are an excellent source of protein, and just 88 grams (g), or 1 cup raw (Source: www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/284765)

Corn: Corn contains around 5 g of protein per 1-cup serving.

Lentils: Lentils are some of the most protein-packed vegetables around, with 1 cup of lentils containing almost 18 g. Lentils are also significant sources of fiber, fantastic for the heart and provide more iron than most other vegetables.

Other vegetables with protein include: broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, cucumbers, garlic, lettuce, mushrooms, onions, parsley, peppers, potatoes, pumpkins, radishes, spinach, squash, sweet potatoes and tomatoes. Fruits that contain protein are apples, apricots, blueberries, cherries and grapefruit.  (Also chick peas and quinoa are good sources.)

Also, chia seeds: ‘Complete’ proteins are protein foods that contain all the essential amino acids in the right proportion for human health. Many plant foods do not provide complete protein: for example, most grains are lacking in lysine, and most beans and pulses are low in methionine. This means that we need to eat other foods that are rich in that missing amino acid, to make up the deficit. But chia seeds do have all of those vital amino acids.
From: www.superfoodUK.com.

Here is a reprint from the ‘Net as to why eating lower on the food chain is a great idea:

 

  • Environmental Stewardship – Eat lower on the food chain …

    environment.worcesterdiocese.org/eatlower-on…

    Eat lower on the food chain. There are health benefits as well as environmental benefits when we are eating lower on the food chain. To name a few of these health benefits, they include reducing heart disease, limiting cancer risks, and improving your diet. In terms of environmental benefits, producing fruits and vegetables requires less energy and water than most meat.

 

Finally, there’s a video my friend Krista told me to watch, which I plan to do:

the film that environmental organizations don’t want you to see!  “Cowspiracy may be the most important film made to inspire saving the planet.”— Louie Psihoyos, Oscar-Winning Director of “The Cove” “ A documentary that will rock and inspire the environmental movement.

Caprese Salad/Insalata Caprese from the Italian Moms Cookbook

Tuesday, July 5th, 2016

A few weeks ago I reviewed Elisa Costantini’s wonderful book, Italian Moms: Spreading Their Art to Every Table. The book is compiled by son Frank, who gave me permission to post other recipes from the cookbook, so today I have chosen one that I first tasted in Italy five years ago. It is simple and easy as well as fresh and delicious!  (Internal link to that review: https://www.menupause.info/archives/18897).

Italian Moms is self-published by the author Elisa and her son Frank. It is available through Amazon.com. You can also buy an autographed copy from Elisa’s website: www.italianmomscooking.com. It costs $24.95.

+In the book, both the English and the Italian words for this salad appear, so in Italian it is called Insalata Caprese.



Ingredients

3 large ripe tomatoes (I would use organic-es)

1 pound fresh mozzarella cheese

1 bunch fresh basil

1/4 cup olive oil

2 tablespoons red wine vinegar

pinch of salt

Directions

Slice the tomatoes and mozzarella cheese into 1/4 inch thick slices. Layer alternating slices of tomatoes, then basil leaf and then a mozzarella on a serving dish. Drizzle the salad with olive oil and drips of he vinegar. Garnish with a pinch of salt and serve with *prosciutto-wrapped bread sticks.

* NOTE: Since I don’t eat meat, I omitted the prosciutto-wrapped bread sticks and used my photo instead of the one from the book, which has this ingredient. I added olives instead.

P.S. Thanks to Frank Costantini for his permission to post more of his mom’s recipes.