Posts Tagged ‘sprouts’

Early Fall Salads with Pomegranate Seeds, Berries, Dragon Fruit, Mangoes, and Okra

Thursday, October 10th, 2019

Fall is my favorite season and also a time for me to shift to “fall foods” that I have not had during the summer, such as apples and pomegranates. But early fall is also still warm, so I have not given up on berries and mangoes. As for vegetable salads, your choices are almost endless this time of year, so be sure to use organically or responsibly grown produce. Feel free to substitute your favorite fruits and veggies if mine are not to your liking.

 

Colorful Fall Fruit Salad


I decided to use cocktail glasses and took them from above the glasses, but the angle is still funky!

Utensils: Strainer, cutting board & knife, bowl and serving dishes
Prep. Time: 15 minutes
Cooking Time: None
Categories: Gluten Free, Vegan, No added sugars

Ingredients (All organic)

1/2 red or white dragon fruit*, scooped out into small pieces+
1/4 mango, peeled and sliced
1/4 cup blueberries or blackberries, rinsed and drained
1/4 cup red pear or red apple, cut into small slices or chunks
unsweetened dried coconut
chopped walnuts
Pomegranate juice to moisten (or apple or pear juice)

Directions

1. Wash strain, cut or slice fruits into small pieces, except for berries (leave whole). Add a small amount of pomegranate juice.

2. Place in ramekins or small bowls or cocktail glasses. Garnish with coconut and/or chopped walnuts.

3. Serve at room temperature or place in ‘fridge until ready to serve.

+ I recently posted a recipe with dragon fruit. Just type dragon fruit into the Search Box on Home Page.

 

Triple Greens & Veggies

Utensils: Strainer, cutting board & knife, bowl and serving dishes
Prep. Time: 15 minutes
Cooking Time: None
Categories: Gluten Free, Vegan, No added sugars

Ingredients

Organic watercress, baby spinach, and red-tipped Romaine lettuce (= to about 2 cups), washed and dried
3-4 green or red okra*
Scallions, washed, roots and dark green stems removed, then sliced lengthwise or into small circles crosswise
Shredded carrot (off-white, orange or purple)
Sprouts
Dressing of your choice (I made a Hold-Your-Horses dressing from a previous posting because the tofu base gives me a source of protein. (Just type Hold Your Horses Dressing into the Search Box on the Home Page)
Optional additional items: slivered fennel, olives, walnuts

Directions

1. Place lettuces in a large bowl. If the cress still has roots, remove. If not using the salad right away, rip the lettuce leaves by hand rather than cut with a knife. (Doing the latter means the greens will turn brown around the cut edges sooner.)

2. Wash and slice okra crosswise, to expose the pinwheel pattern. Add to bowl.

3. Wash and shred the carrot and add to the bowl. Toss with your favorite dressing and serve immediately or place in ‘fridge for later use without dressing. Garnish with sprouts after tossing with dressing.

*Okra raw is very tasty, a little like cucumber. Since many people avoid okra because of it slimy texture when cooked, most of us don’t know that eaten raw, it is quite delicious! Here is some info on okra that might convince you to try it raw:

The amount of nutrients you find in a portion of okra makes it the kind of food you would want to include in your meal plans. For example, one cup contains 3.2 grams of fiber that is about an eighth of a person’s daily needs. Sufficient fiber content is essential for the effective working of the digestive system. This same serving of okra also delivers 82 mg of the calcium the body needs for good bone and teeth health. In addition, you find it also contains 1.9 gram of protein and just 32 calories. These are just a few examples of its high nutritional value. (Quoted Source: https://facty.com/search/?term=Benefits%20of%20Okra)

Spring into Sprouts! Earth Day Every Day

Wednesday, April 17th, 2019

 

One of the Many Earth Day Logos

Sprouting is a great project to delve into, especially if you have no backyard garden to plant flowers and veggies. We have a patio, and my husband plants the flowers while I grow the herbs and some veggies. But “baby greens,” also called spoil sprouts, gourmet sprouts, or micro-greens can be done on your windowsill. By sprouting organic seeds, you are growing locally and organically. How good is that?

 

Ready to harvest! Sunflower on the left and buckwheat on the right.

Tools: Bowls for soaking seeds, strainers, small plastic tubs, organic garden soil, paper towels, dark plastic bags,

Here are the basic steps:

  1. Find some small containers, such as tubs from strawberries, tofu, or other foods that come in plastic containers. Wash and dry and fill with potting soil. (I buy organic soil from a local nursery and also may be able to obtain composted soil.)
  2. Soak about 1/2 cup of seeds of choice in jars or bowls overnight. Next day, strain and leave in the strainer to sprout a little before planting, maybe one or to days, rinsing the seeds at least once each day. You may not see any “tails” yet.
  3. On the second or third day, fill the tubs with soil and add water to soil to moisten. Spread the seeds onto the soil, shoulder-to-shoulder, that is, don’t worry about spacing. Moisten a piece of paper towel twice the size of the tub and fold in half over the seeds.  Moisten the paper towel. Cover with a dark plastic bag and tie off the end and then place on a warm windowsill. Check in 24 hours. If the paper towel is dry, moisten and place tub back in its mini-greenhouse.
  4. In 3 or 4 days you should see the black plastic looking higher than when you first planted the seeds. Time to remove the paper towel and black plastic and let the seeds sprout on your windowsill, giving them some water at least every other day or every day is the temperature on the sill dries out the soil.

Here are the micro-greens while they are still growing.
The black hulls are beginning to fall off.

5. By the time one week has passed, more or less depending on the temperature on your sill and whether or not it is a sunny window, the hulls will probably fall off by themselves and land on your windowsill, so putting a small tray under the tubs may be a good idea.

6. You can start cutting down the tallest sprouts and let the shorter ones come up now that they are not “shaded” by the earlier sprouts. The ones you cut down will not grow back, but you will get a second harvest from the shorter ones that were shaded by the earlier sprouts.

7. The micro-greens are full of nutrients, since if they were placed in the ground, they would become plants. And since they are eaten raw, none of the nutrients are destroyed, so only cut down what you can use each day, keeping them “alive” in the soil.

Add micro-greens to salads, sandwiches, as garnish for soups, sprinkled on celery stuffed with nut butters, in wraps and just to munch on!

 

This is a cooking-by-the-strings of your apron recipe, because a lot depends on the house temperature, the quality of the seeds, and “getting to know” what the seedlings need. I also soaked and planted peas to make pea shoots, and they spoiled before they sprouted and I had to compost them. So don;t worry if the first couple of times you have problems. You can email me at: menupause.info@gmail with questions.