Rosa Parks and Sierra Club for Black History Month

From Sierra Club:

Join us Friday, February 4, for Transit Equity Day! We’re working with grassroots transit rider groups, environmental, climate justice, civil rights and faith organizations, and transit workers unions to host actions that recognize transit equity as a civil right on Rosa Parks’ birthday.  Together, we’re demanding investments in safe, reliable, and affordable public transit service and better pay and benefits to expand and retain the workforce.

https://www.labor4sustainability.org/transit-equity-2022/TED-2022-events/

Black History Month

What better way to kick off Black History Month than with a transportation action noted above to celebrate Rosa Parks birthday! Here’s what I found when I Googled her name:

Rosa Parks: Activist

Rosa Louise McCauley Parks was an American civil rights activist best known for her role in the Montgomery bus boycott. en.wikipedia.org

When Rosa Parks did not sit at the back of the bus, she set off a spark that ignited a movement that now states: Black Lives Matter.* Martin Luther King’s dream talk was in 1963. Parks’ bus protest was in 1955, and Black Lives Matter Movement is more recent. Here’s a brief definition of this from Wikipedia:

*The movement began in July 2013, with the use of the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter on social media after the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the shooting death of African-American teen Trayvon Martin 17 months earlier in February 2012.

Look at the gaps in these events and you can see that the fight for Black Rights is a long, sometimes slow process. I remember Rosa Parks from my teen years and thought she was a brave, young, black woman to carry out a non-violent act of protest and continued to be an activist throughout her life.

P.S. As a briefing leader for The Hunger Project I learned that one person CAN make a difference. Rosa Parks was one person who did make a difference!

 

 

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