Posts Tagged ‘red wine’

Heart Healthy Salad

Sunday, February 11th, 2018

On the Home Page for February, I listed 10 foods that are considered heart healthy by the Global Health Center. These 10 foods in alphabetical order are: ALMONDS, ASPARAGUS, AVOCADO, BROCCOLI, CHICKPEAS, OLIVES, RED WINE, SALMON, and WALNUTS. I have many recipes already using these foods (except salmon), but I decided to design one just for February using spinach, walnuts (or almonds) or avocado, olives and/or olive oil, and chickpeas*.

 

Utensils: Cutting board and knife, strainer, salad spinner, mixing bowl and serving platter
Prep. Time: 15 minutes if chickpeas are already cooked*
*Cooking Time: 30 minutes to cook chickpeas if using dried and soaked garbanzo beans (chickpeas)
Categories: Vegan (V), Gluten Free (GF), No Sugar Added (NSA)

 

Ingredients (organic items when available)

1 1/2 – 2 cups fresh, organic baby spinach, rinsed and dried
two or three sliced scallions (mostly white part)
1/4 cup chopped walnuts/sliced almonds or sliced avocado+
1/4 cup of your favorite olives++
1/4-1/2 cup chickpeas
2 or 3 sliced radishes or 1/2 sliced carrot (for color & taste)
1 Tbl. olive oil
juice of 1/2 lemon or red wine vinegar
salt & pepper to taste
Sprouts (optional)

Directions

  1. Place rinsed and dried spinach in large bowl. Add scallions, nuts, olives, and cooked chickpeas.
  2. Add olive oil and lemon and toss. Add small amounts of salt & pepper and toss again.
  3. Place salad on a serving platter or salad bowl. Garnish with sprouts, if using and serve deliciously….maybe with red wine??

*I soak dried chickpeas and sprout them for 3 or 4 days. I then freeze them on a cookie sheet and take out a handful as needed, cooking them for about 25 minutes. The sprouting cuts down on cooking time and increases their nutritional value. Canned chickpeas can be used, but be sure to drain them
and to use cans that have no BPA lining.

+ The fats in nuts seem to be enough without the avocado, so feel free to use avocado instead of nuts

+ +My favorite olives are called Castelvetrano from the city of the same name. They are naturally green when ripe and do not have that mouth puckering effect that non-ripe green olives have. Available in health food stores, Wegman’s olive bar, and probably gourmet food shops. Love them!

Heart Matters: February 2018

Wednesday, January 31st, 2018

January is almost over, so I have stopped saying Happy New Year to people I meet.
Now I can start saying Happy Valentine’s Day or Happy Healthy Heart Month!

February is also still cold in the Northeast, so I will be posting a couple of winter poems by my virtual poet-in-residence, Mary Lou Meyers. And the snowy photo below is from my friend Hope. It is the creek next to her farmhouse when we had a snowstorm in January. The beauty of winter, especially after a storm, is something we don’t rave about, but I do love the snowy landscape in winter, especially before the snow is trod upon.


Winter also means more soups, stews, root veggies, and darker greens, so I plan to feature some hearty/hardy dishes.  When I Googled the difference between these two words, here’s what came up (direct quote):

These two words overlap somewhat, but usually the word you want is “hearty.” The standard expressions are “a hearty appetite,” “a hearty meal,” a “hearty handshake,” “a hearty welcome,” and “hearty applause.” “Hardy” turns up in “hale and hardy,” but should not be substituted for “hearty” in the other expressions. May 19, 2016 hardy / hearty | Common Errors in English Usage and More …https://brians.wsu.edu/2016/05/19/hardy-hearty/

(I think both words can apply to heart-warming, heart-healthy, and hardy dishes.)

Since I will be away for one week in February, I may repost some of my favorite soups or stews, with special emphasis on foods good for the heart. Speaking of which, in globalhealthcenter.com, Dr. Edward Group writes:

Your heart is the most important muscle in your body. If it’s weak, you’re weak. There are a few things you can do to provide your heart with what it needs to be at its best. The first is to get plenty of exercise. Your heart is a muscle, it needs to be worked. Second, avoid toxins that damage your cardiovascular system — don’t smoke, avoid high fat foods, and limit (eliminate?) your refined sugar intake.* Here are ten foods you can add to your diet to increase your intake of vitamins, minerals, nutrients, and antioxidants necessary to maintain a healthy heart. And they’re delicious too.
(Photo also from same website.)

  1. Salmon
  2. Broccoli
  3. Asparagus
  4. Chickpeas
  5. Spinach
  6. Almonds
  7. Olives
  8. Red Wine
  9. Avocado
  10. Walnuts

I plan to feature some of these foods in my recipes. Except for salmon and red wine, they are all perfect for my meatless recipes.
*I will also write about the link between sugar and heart health.

February is also Black History Month or African-American History Month.  If you type ibn Celebrating Black History Month, you will be led to this website: www.poetryfoundation.org.  You can click on several poems by African-Americans such as Langston Hughes, Maya Angelou, Frederick Douglass or type in the poet’s name. Here is an excerpt from one of the poems on this site, written by Elizabeth Alexander, entitled Praise Song for the Day (A Poem for Barack Obama’s Presidential Inauguration). I chose it because it speaks of love, and February seems to be the perfect time to post it. Go to the website to read the entire poem, since I do not have permission to do so.

…..Some live by love thy neighbor as thyself,
others by first do no harm or take no more
than you need. What if the mightiest word is love?

Love beyond marital, filial, national,
love that casts a widening pool of light,
love with no need to pre-empt grievance…..

Apropos to love in all its forms is Valentine’s Day on February 14th. No sooner have retail stores packed away the paraphernalia of Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, etc. then do all the trimmings of Valentine’s Day appear. Since I met my husband Alan 15 years ago right before Valentine’s Day, I feel quite sentimental about it, so I will post something about this day, maybe how it can be used as a day for showing love to family, friends, Mother Earth, as well as partners, spouses, and significant others, as Elizabeth Alexander writes so eloquently above.

Here’s wishing you a heart-healthy attitude about your own health
and those you love.