National Oatmeal Month

Thursday, January 13th, 2011

I found this article on the ‘Net & thought it would make a good summary of the benefits of oatmeal. Below the article is my choice of oatmeal in the form of steel cut oats that my daughter Basha introduced me to. Supposedly, McCann’s pats are not processed with any gluten grains, so celiac individuals can use it. (Check with your doctor or McCann’s to be sure.)


In 1999, the FDA approved the addition of a health claim to product package labeling which you have probably seen a million times, particularly if you spend any time in the cereal aisle at the grocery store….The most recent statistics from heart research indicate that eating at least three servings a day of whole grains decreases the risk of heart disease by 20 to 30 percent.

Oatmeal is completely a whole-grain food! Now let’s look at cholesterol and oatmeal–one of the leading causes of heart disease is high cholesterol which causes a fatty build-up on artery walls…. The composition and content of oatmeal is such that it can adhere to the bad cholesterol and eliminate it. That alone is a pretty amazing fact: oatmeal keeps the good cholesterol and gets rid of the bad.

Oatmeal as a whole grain is a complex carbohydrate. That’s the best kind of carbohydrate–the one that stays in the body for a long period of time, breaking down slowly to help regulate our blood sugar levels and give us sustained energy and endurance. Oatmeal also has positive effects on weight maintenance and reduces the risk of gaining weight…..

Oatmeal itself has no cholesterol and almost no fat. It also is a nice little package of vitamins and minerals by itself with a good variety of B-complex vitamins, and vitamin A, as well as calcium and iron, among many others. Another oatmeal nutrient is fiber, which has all types of health benefits for the heart and in the digestive process.


Now, my choice of oatmeal is McCann’s. It takes a little longer to prepare, but I like the fact that it is not mushy and soft, but rather has a crunchy texture.

Note: This is imported from Ireland, so you might want to try a local brand if gluten sensitivity is not a problem.



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