STOP PLASTIC POLLUTION: Save Our Marine Life

Here’s a petition that warrants your attention and hopefully you will sign. es
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To some marine animals, chemical additives in plastics can smell like food. A new study just confirmed that oleamide, an additive used in plastics, confuses hermit crabs into scavenging for far-off plastic that they confuse for food.1

 

In order to save our marine wildlife, we need to stop plastic pollution.

Tell your U.S. House representative to support the Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act.

 

When chemicals from microplastics seep into hermit crab habitat, it alters their behavior and makes them vulnerable to predators and starvation.2 Sea turtles are also drawn to the food-like scent of plastic pollution, and plastic debris is often found lodged in their stomachs and those of whales and seabirds.

With more than 8 million tons of plastic dumped in the ocean every year, we need to stem the flow of plastic waste as much and as fast as we can.3

The Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act is a comprehensive plan to protect our world from the harmful impacts of plastics, from our wildlife to our oceans to our communities. Will you stand up for the planet by telling your U.S. House representative to support the Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act?

Plastic waste has been found in nearly every corner of the planet. With the Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act, we can finally begin to end the cycle of waste by reducing single-use plastics and enforcing producer responsibility.

The Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act aims to combat plastic pollution across the entire lifecycle, from production to sale to disposal, ensuring waste stays out of our waters and wildlife.

Keep the planet green and the ocean blue by supporting the Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act today.

 

Thank you,

Wendy Wendlandt
President

1. “A chemical in plastic is tricking hermit crabs into thinking trash is food,” CBC, August 11, 2021.
2. “A chemical in plastic is tricking hermit crabs into thinking trash is food,” CBC, August 11, 2021.
3. Jennifer Hassan, “Hermit crabs may be ‘excited’ by plastic pollution in ocean, researchers say,” The Washington Post, August 13, 2021.

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