Food retailers waste 43 billion pounds of food every year (Sierra Club Stat)

Thursday, December 8th, 2016

Note: Just received this from my friend Honey. Even though it says “Come Thanksgiving….” and it has come and gone, the message from Sierra Club is still important…..

sierra

Tell America’s largest supermarkets to curb food waste and donate unused food.

Come Thanksgiving, 1 in 7 American families won’t have enough to eat, although an overwhelming percent of the country’s overall food supply goes uneaten.1 Thankfully, there are many solutions food retailers can enact to turn this problem around.
In the United States, grocery stores account for ten percent of overall food waste.2 Food retailers generate waste by overstocking, demanding” cosmetic perfection” in produce, pushing promotions, and creating confusing sell-by dates.3 Together, these practices lead to billions of pounds of unused food generated by American grocery stores that end up in our landfills every year.4

Food retailers must address this major food waste crisis.

To solve this problem, Americans can look to France for guidance. In an unprecedented move, France banned food waste in large grocery stores. French supermarkets cannot legally throw away or destroy unused food. Instead, they are now required by law to donate unused food to local food banks and charities.5

Ask America’s largest grocery store brands to follow France’s example.

The environmental impact of food waste cannot be understated. If food waste was included in a list of countries ranked by their greenhouse gas emissions, it would come in third place after the United States and China.6 In addition, food waste represents a huge loss of freshwater and groundwater resources and agricultural land usage.

Demand that America’s largest grocery store brands curb food waste and donate unused food to the people who need it the most.

In it together,

Suz Amedi
SierraRise

Tell America’s largest supermarkets to curb food waste and donate unused food.

GO to add.up.org to sign the petition and see other news from Sierra Club.

(I tried to cut and paste the link, but not working, but was able to put the picture of food waste below and  SierraRise logo into my WordPress media. es)

mx_900

This email was sent by the Sierra Club

2101 Webster St., Suite 1300 Oakland, CA 94612

References:
1. Bello, Marisol. (16 April 2014). “Hunger In America: 1 in 7 Rely on Food Banks.” USA TODAY.
2. Dvorsky, George. (5 February 2016). “Why the US May Never Pass a Food Waste Law Like France.” Gizmodo.
3. Jacobs, Harrison. (15 October 2014). “Why Grocery Stores Like Trader Joe’s Throw Out So Much Perfectly Good Food.” Business Insider.
4. Dvorsky, George. (5 February 2016). “Why the US May Never Pass a Food Waste Law Like France.” Gizmodo.
5. Chrisafis, Angelique. (4 February 2016). “French Law Forbids Food Waste by Supermarkets.” The Guardian.
6. (11 May 2015). “The Environmental Impact of Food Waste.” Move for Hunger.
Photo Credit: Emmet / CC0

PETITION: Tell Congress: Reduce food waste now

Tuesday, January 26th, 2016


Note: This is a petition sent by my friend Honey. Since Menupause is a food site, I think this one is very important to me and hopefully to you. Thanx to my friend Honey for sending it.


Nearly 50 million Americans, including more than 15 million children, are currently going hungry.1 As the richest nation in the world, it’s tragic that so many live in food insecure homes.

At the same time, 40 percent of all food in America is wasted. If we reduced the amount of food we throw away by just 15% percent, we could feed nearly 25 million hungry people.2

I recently introduced landmark legislation to combat hunger and protect our environment by reducing food waste across the country. My comprehensive bill includes a provision that would reform the “sell by” date most of our food carries. We all know that food is still safe and healthy far past that date — sometimes even years later — but these dates are set by manufacturers, some of whom are looking to turn a profit by selling more product when you throw yours away.

We can reduce food waste and feed hungry families, but my bill may remain stalled in a dysfunctional Congress without all of us speaking out now in support.

That’s why I started my own campaign on CREDOMobilize.com, which allows activists to start their own petitions. My petition to the U.S. Congress says the following:

Reducing food waste will help feed millions of hungry Americans, protect our fragile environment, and slow the effects of climate change. Support Rep. Chellie Pingree’s Food Recovery Act now.

Tell Congress: Reduce food waste to help feed the hungry and protect the environment. Click here to sign the petition.

Roughly 133 billion pounds of food are wasted each year by stores, farms, restaurants, schools, businesses, and homes across America. The cost of this waste to the American public is enormous: $160 billion a year of wasted food is tossed in landfills and down drains, which works out to about $125 a month for an average family.3

Food waste isn’t just a hunger issue, either. Landfills in America are comprised of roughly 20 percent wasted food, which emit large amounts of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. According to the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, wasted food “accounts for an estimated 35% of freshwater consumption, 31% percent of cropland, and 30% of fertilizer usage; as well as 2% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.”4

By making it easier for consumers to know their food can still be safe, and by providing incentives for business and farms to reduce food waste, we will go a long way to protecting the environment and preventing hunger for millions of Americans.

One provision of my legislation has already passed the House, but given the dysfunction in Washington and resistance from food manufacturers, getting this bill passed will be difficult without your activism today.

Will you join me and add your name to my petition urging Congress to help feed America’s most vulnerable and protect our environment by reducing food waste?

Thank you for all you do.

Rep. Chellie Pingree

Subscribe