Plastic Pollution Petition

Sunday, July 19th, 2020

Humans discard so much plastic that it’s like a garbage truck full of waste is being dumped into the ocean every single minute. We need to ban the worst forms of single-use plastic and stem the tide of pollution. Ask your governor to ban polystyrene foam in your state.

Humans discard so much plastic that it’s like a garbage truck full of waste is being dumped into the ocean every single minute. We need to ban the worst forms of single-use plastic and stem the tide of pollution. Ask your governor to ban polystyrene foam in your state.

TAKE ACTION

(You will need to choose your home state in the signing)

Seabird parents lovingly care for their babies, flying out to sea every day to find enough food for their young. But sometimes, no matter how much they feed their chicks, the babies fail to thrive. They grow up lighter, with shorter bills and wings. Some develop kidney problems. Some die

Why? Because the ocean is so full of trash that seabird parents are feeding plastic garbage to their babies instead of actual food.1 Humans discard so much plastic that it’s as though a garbage truck full of waste is being dumped into the ocean every single minute.2

Birds aren’t the only ones impacted: Plastic is showing up in our bodies, too. It’s clear that we simply need to stop using so much plastic.

If you care about stopping the tide of plastic flowing into our environment, here’s how to help: Ask your governor to ban polystyrene foam — one of the worst forms of plastic pollution — in your state.

Polystyrene foam, which most of us call Styrofoam, is particularly bad for the environment because it never truly degrades. It just breaks down into smaller and smaller pieces that animals can easily mistake for food.

We use polystyrene foam cups and containers for only a few minutes before throwing them away — but those same cups and containers go on to threaten the environment for hundreds of years.

We don’t need it. It hurts the planet. It’s time to ban it.

Ask your governor to support a ban on polystyrene foam in your state.

The time is right to go all in to support a ban on polystyrene foam. We know we can win: Our sister groups Environment Maine and Environment Maryland led the charge to pass bans on polystyrene in their states last year — the very first bans of their type in the nation.

Together, we can put wildlife over waste and put a stop to one of the worst forms of plastic pollution in states across the country.

Send a message to your governor today.

 

Thank you,

Wendy Wendlandt
Acting President

P.S. Our work to defend the environment can’t stop and won’t stop in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. We’ll keep advocating on your behalf — at a safe social distance — for clean air, clean water, clean energy, wildlife and open spaces, and a livable climate.

1. Jason Daley, “Eating Even One Piece of Plastic Has Health Consequences for Baby Seabirds,” The Smithsonian, August 5, 2019.
2. “Our planet is drowning in plastic pollution,” UN Environment, last accessed March 12, 2020.
3. Sarah Gibbens, “You eat thousands of bits of plastic every year,” National Geographic, June 5, 2019.

Donate today. A cleaner, greener future is within our reach. Your donation today can help us bring the vision we share a little closer to reality.

Environment America, Inc.
1543 Wazee Street, Suite 410, Denver, CO 80202, (303) 801-0581
Federal Advocacy Office: 600 Pennsylvania Ave SE, Suite 400, Washington, DC 20003, (202) 683-1250
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Jane Fonda’s New Look for Earth Day, Every Day

Tuesday, February 11th, 2020

I didn’t watch the Oscars Sunday night, but I did see this photo of Jane Fonda with her new, natural hairdo that I love, on my computer and applaud her announcement that she will not be buying any new clothes as her “contribution” to climate change. PEOPLE Magazine attributes her change of heart (in February yet, American Heart Month!) to Greta Thunberg, the climate change activist who has been in the news. Jane said that Greta made her think about consumerism and all the effort that goes into being a consumer. Fonda said, “We don’t need more stuff,’ I have to walk the talk. So I’m not buying any more clothes.”

 

Sarah Berman’s Closet

 

Last year on Mother’s Day I went to see the Sarah Berman’s Closet exhibit at the American Jewish History Museum in Philadelphia. This older woman scaled down her lifestyle, with everything in the reproduced closet in the exhibit was white: clothes, shoes, linens, etc. I made a decision that in 2020 I would buy clothes that are sustainably produced, focusing on organic cotton whenever possible. Additionally, I am slowly recycling clothing that I no longer need or wear and buying as little as possible, since I have more than I already need. This is part of my personal de-cluttering campaign to streamline everything in our apartment, based on the book I read by Gretchen Rubin: Outer Order/Inner Calm.

 

 

More about Cotton:

If you go to this website: https://www.theworldcounts.com/challenges/consumption/clothing/environmental-impact-of-cotton-production  you will find out more about the impact of pesticides on fabrics, especially cotton.
Here is a direct quote from the site:

Your t-shirt is tainted with chemicals:

More chemical pesticides are used for cotton than for any other crop. Cotton accounts for 16 percent of global insecticide releases. 60 percent of the world’s cotton is used for clothing and another 35 percent for home furnishing.

Based on that information, which I actually learned about some years ago, plus the impact of Sarah Berman’s Closet Exhibit, plus Jane Fonda’s announcement, tells me I am not in the minority, and even if I am, I like being in that minority with Jane Fonda. We have one other thing in common. I was born on December 2nd, 1937 and Jane Fonda was born Dec. 22, 1937. So we are basically the same age. And I have a similar haircut. And her wearing her red coat is another kudo for reminding us of the GO RED FOR WOMEN campaign from The American Heart Association, also mentioned above.

 

So I applaud Jane Fonda for stepping up to the plate and wearing a dress that, heaven forbid!,
she already wore before. BRAVA!

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