9/11 Essay with photos of the Memorial in New York City at Ground Zero

My grandson Max was born on 9/11, but 10 years before the tragic event on 9/11/2001. So for ten years I was able to celebrate his birthday without any intervening bad news. Now, of course, I have mixed feelings: I want to celebrate his birthday and I also want to pay homage to the tragic events on 9/11 and all the people who died in the towers or planes that day and all those who were working in the wreckage of the towers and subsequently died from the fumes, the dust, and the chemicals that spewed into the air, even though the person in charge of the EPA said the air was safe!

 

In the Smithsonian Institute Magazine as well as in a documentary last night, there were interviews with young people born in 2001 0r 2002, whose fathers who died in the planes or the buildings. These children are now 20 years old or almost 20 years old, and their stories are quite revealing about how they view life because of this tragic event right before they were born.

Just as Pearl Harbor may have been the most tragic event of my early years, 9/11 for people in the single numbers or just born on that day or soon after have their own tragic event. And with the pandemic, we are losing thousands and thousands of people from bacteria, so we are “at war” with this virus and the battle is still raging.

The 20th anniversary of 9/11 will be hard for many of us. Interestingly, it takes place during the 10 Days of Awe between Rosh Hoshana (The Jewish New Year) and Yom Kippur (The Day of Atonement), a very solemn time to review this past year and see where we have offended anyone and make amends. Instead of reviewing our mistakes as sins, we view them as “missing the mark” and offer our heartfelt apologies to those people we may have offended or hurt.

Reading the stories in the Smithsonian and watching the documentary has given me hope that young people of today are aware that we are a global village and what happens to people in one country can happen everywhere, as COVID 19 has shown.

Let us use 9/11 as a time to pause and take stock of ourselves and our world and see what we can do to make our global village safer, cleaner, and filled with empathy and compassion, instead of hate. If each person does this, we could feel a shift in our energies and emerge as a world where peace and wholeness are possible and an environment where it is safe to breathe, swim, eat, and sleep. I wish for such as world NOW! and since I believe each person can make a difference, I plan
to sign up for a Climate Reality project and continue to post information on the environment on my website.

Stay safe! Stay positive! Stay vigilant!  ellensue

 

P.S. I wrote this on Friday aft. and post-dated it for tomorrow at 9:11 am.

More Heart Information

The American Heart Association (AHA) sent me an envelope filled with information on our hearts. I used the title of the greeting card, Celebrate Your Heart, for my last posting a few days ago, and now I am adding some important information about heart disease from this same organization.

(Link to previous posting: https://www.menupause.info/celebrate-your-h…nd-heart-disease/)

Testing:

Healthy Hearts depend on many factors, some of which are: Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar, Body Mass Index (BMI), Total Cholesterol and  HDL (good) Cholesterol. Most blood tests will provide this information, except for Blood Pressure, which your doctor can determine in an office visit.

Physical Activity and Your Heart:

Most articles I have read suggest what the AMH recommends: At least 130 minutes of exercise per week of moderate exercise or 75 minutes per week of vigorous exercise or a combination of both. If you do 30 minutes per day for at least 5 days, that should be sufficient.

My exercise plan includes 2 sessions of cleaning house, which often take 1-2 hours; tai chi for 45 min. once each week; yoga once each week; treadmill and weights in the condo  gym or my own bedroom, once or twice each week; walking once each week in winter and more often in the summer, along with swimming every day. When I miss tai chi or yoga, I aim to make it up in our condo gym.

Preventing & Managing Diabetes:

Ask your doctor for a fasting glucose test, control your weight and blood cholesterol. I don’t agree with all their dietary recommendations so I go to my D.O. for that information. But I do agree that smoking and second-hand smoke only exacerbate cardiovascular issues for people with diabetes.

High Blood Pressure: While salt is generally the big issue here, the other two factors of avoiding stress with meditation, toga, walking, etc. and limiting your alcohol intake are also important. (For women especially, too much alcohol is a high risk factor, so the AHA recommends only one drink for day.)

Healthy Eating: Of course, as a nutrition educator, I focus on food that is fresh, organic when possible, lightly cooked without deep-frying or grilling at high heats, lots of green veggies, etc.

Smoking: Since there are no nutrients in smoking and nothing good to say about this addiction, go for help if you want to erase this risk factor.

The warning signs for a heart attack include:

Chest discomfort that lasts for more than a few minutes and can include pressure, fullness, squeezing, or pain.

Discomfort in other parts of the upper body (arms, legs, back, neck, jaw or stomach),

Other signs: shortness of breath, cold sweat, nausea, light-headedness.

The American Heart Association also had a small insert about stroke. Considered a medical emergency because time lost is brain cells lost, these warnings are important:

Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg (especially on one side of the body).

Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding.

Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.

Sudden, severe headache with no known cause.

Do Not Delay: Call 911 or EMS (emergency Medical Services)

Below the list is a fact that I did not know: Check the time any of these symptoms appear and take immediate action. A clot-busting drug can reduce long-term disability for the most common type of stroke, but only if given within three hours of the start of symptoms.

All this information can be found on the Internet and probably in brochures in the hospital or doctor’s office. Become familiar with risk factors and warning signs and take immediate action.

For more information, go to the website: www.heart.org
or call 1-800-AHA-USA1

Copyright ©2023 Ellen Sue Spicer-Jacobson. | Website by Parrish Digital.