Diabetes Follow-Up from Last Month


This is a photo of the Mediterranean Diet noted below. It is from a website called: www.medicinenet.com

One month ago was World Diabetes Day. This is a follow-up exactly one month later from the  Nov. 2nd issue of Parade Magazine, an insert from Walgreens Drug called Mission Control: Taking control of DIABETES takes an extra hand, authored by Maureen Sangiorgio. Here is the article’s definition of diabetes as a direct quote:

Diabetes is the condition in which the body does not properly turn the food we eat into glucose, or sugar, for our bodies to use energy. The pancreas, an organ that lies near the stomach, makes insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies. When you have diabetes, your body is either not making enough insulin to feed your cells (Type 1) or the cells are resisting the insulin (Type 2). This causes sugars to build up in your blood.

This article is an excellent overview with statistics from the American Diabetes Association that notes nearly 29 million Americans have diabetes and about 86 million have higher-than-normal blood glucose levels that could lead to Type 2 diabetes. (This jives with the stats I posted in my essay on World Diabetes Day, Nov. 14th.)

The good news is that there are more ways today to control, prevent, or delay the onset of diabetes. How? As Dr. Katz points out in Disease Proof (my review link) this can be done with lifestyle changes in diet and exercise.

Here is what the article lists as lifestyle changes:

  1. Eating the Mediterranean Way with a diet that is rich in whole grains, vegetables, fruit and nuts, and seafood. Cutting back on red meat is also recommended. (I don’t agree with the seafood not only because I am a vegetarian, but because of pollution of our ocean and lakes. es)
  2. Boosting your fiber intake because studies indicated that fiber-rich foods improve glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, carbohydrate metabolism and a better-functioning pancreas. Marjorie Cypress, Ph.D. and president of the ADA notes that women need 25 grams of fiber, while men need 38 grams daily.
  3. Exercising, which helps you “walk away” from diabetes. The recommendation from Dr. Cypress is a combination of walking and strength training, with an aim of moderate to vigorous exercise 30 minutes daily, spread out over your day or in one session. This section explains how muscles pull glucose out of the bloodstream for energy; thus, “the more you move, the lower the glucose levels.”
  4. Managing your mood is also suggested. According to a study in the Archives of Internal Medicine, depression can actually raise one’s risk of diabetes. IF you have lost interest in activities, have sleep or appetite changes, find trouble concentrating or feel guilt, anxiety, morning sadness and especially suicidal thoughts, get help!
  5. Using a glucose meter to measure your level of blood sugar is important. (Keeping a food diary so you can see what you ate that might spike your blood sugar levels was recommended at a seminar I attended on diabetes.

Finally, the article also notes the same plate guide that that my earlier article posted, with your plate divided in half and one half divided into half again. One half is filled with non-starchy veggies such as broccoli or carrots; ¼ is for your protein source; one fourth is for starchy food such as beans or whole grains.

Thanks, Walgreens, for an excellent article!

4 Responses to “Diabetes Follow-Up from Last Month”

  1. Mary-Lou Meyers Says:

    Good article, Diabetes didn’t seem that prominent when I was growing up, and we only knew one neighbor, who was affected by it. I remember how my mother always gave her blueberries when we had picked them by the pailful. Sounds like a good diet for almost anyone who wants to avoid debilitating diseases. So many are prone to such diseases because they live a sedentary life style, and meals which consist of fresh fruits and vegetables. Interesting how depression can leave you at risk for so many diseases, and it seems our life style needs to be such that we are not left vulnerable to stress as well.

  2. ellen sue spicer Says:

    I agree with all of that. Stress is still “understressed” as the cause or increase of many ailments.

  3. ellen sue spicer Says:

    Yes, I reluctantly agree. es

  4. ellen sue spicer Says:

    I agree! es

Leave a Reply

Subscribe