Take Two Tablets: Medicine from the Bible

by Peter Kash, Ed.D., Shmuel Einav, Ph.D. and Linda Friedland, M.D.

What a pleasant surprise to find that in Take Two Tablets, the Bible is not only a spiritual guide for those who read it, but also a health guide for a better quality of life. Under the observant eyes of the learned authors, this 138-page book creates for the reader the intersection of ancient wisdom with modern science in the area of health, or as the Introduction states: the purpose of the book is to expose “the correlation of medicine, healing, and well-being.”

As a nutrition educator, I focused more on the chapters directly related to food, nutrition, and health, even though all of the chapters are interesting. Thus, Chapter 2: Nutrition in the Bible, Chapter 4: Ancient Healing Pathways, Chapter 6: Preventive Medicine in the Bible and Chapter 7: Work and Stress captured most of my interest and attention, although every chapter had gems of information. (There are nine chapters in total.)

Here is a “taste” of some of the chapters to entice you to read it and offer you some facts to digest, even if you have never read the Bible before, because now you will be reading it from a “health guide” perspective.

In Chapter 2 is a section entitled “The Bible: An Ancient Source for the Modern Diet.” The authors list foods we are all familiar with as health-giving: olive oil, The Mediterranean Diet, figs, colorful fruits and vegetables in the Bible (antioxidants in today’s parlance, such as dates and pomegranates), honey, wine/grapes, citron (an ancient citrus fruit), lentils, nuts, apples, chickpeas, ancient seeds, blackberries, cinnamon, garlic, onions/leeks, breast milk, and of course, water as the source of life “but also as a metaphor for love and kindness….” As the authors point out, the atomic weight for water is 18, and in Kabbalah, this number signifies “Life” and “Good Luck.”

In Chapter 4, “Ancient Healing Pathways,” the good doctors and educators discuss The Golden Rule, respect for all human life, enlightenment, and a comparison of Buddhism, Chinese, and Western Medicine. They also write about pulse points as a way to detect imbalances. This aspect of health can be found in Kabbalah, Ayurveda, and Traditional Chinese Medicine. I liked the fact that the writing shows there is much overlapping in the different modalities from different cultures.

In Chapter 6 we learn about preventive medicine in the Bible, including food hygiene, dietary laws, healing from minerals and sea salt, health rules of the Bible, public health, and hand washing as a Biblical practice hundreds of years before it was accepted in hospitals (late 1800s) as a way of preventing disease from spreading.

Perhaps Chapter 7 is the most meaningful for today’s emphasis on stress and its impact on physical and mental health. The authors consider being stressed out as a “universal malady” that needs our attention. Using their scientific backgrounds, the authors explain the stress response, chronic adaptation, and an antidote in the Bible to stress, which is the emphasis on rest, as in taking a Sabbath break. The book discusses the science of rest as well as “a call to rest,” the latter of which is found as a command in the Bible. This chapter also includes information on exercise, self-awareness, and loving-kindness as keys to health. Finally, they list whole foods that “help the body build resilience against the physical effects of stress.” The list

The book discusses the science of rest as well as “a call to rest,” the latter of which is found as a command in the Bible. This chapter also includes information on exercise, self-awareness, and loving-kindness as keys to health. Finally, they list whole foods that “help the body build resilience against the physical effects of stress.” The list includes: blueberries, oranges, apricots, dark green leafy vegetables, whole grains, sweet potatoes, and “even a little dark chocolate,” which has its own nutritional benefits.

The epilogue provides a perfect summary: “Take Two Tablets is not a means to an end, but a means to a beginning. To live life a little better, a little healthier, a little longer for each of us serves a purpose, individually and collectively.” I found this book to be an unexpected resource on nutrition and health, and if you read it, I believe you will also find this “ancient information” can easily be used in today’s world and in your search for a healthy life.

Take Two Tablets is published by White River Press and prices start at $5.99 for Kindle version. It is available on Amazon. A portion of the proceeds will go to cancer organizations in the country in which copies are sold.

2 Responses to “Take Two Tablets: Medicine from the Bible”

  1. Coll Says:

    Fascinating and nourishing to read. Wonder if they mentioned St. John’s Bread,
    made from carob, which I don’t see or hear much about any more. John the
    Baptist during his desert experience was said to have eaten it. (Oh, yes,
    Amazon sells it!)

    Especially observing a restful sabbath sounds good. Also if they mentioned the Buddhist monastic
    practice of oryoki–a ceremonial and mindful manner of eating. My Taiwanese
    friend also told me the Chinese believe that they are also feeding the mind
    when they eat. Most of us can probably slow down our eating anyway!

  2. ellen sue spicer Says:

    I agree! thanx for your insights, ellensue

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