Bitter Sweet Spring Salad

Ayurveda (Science of Life) is a 5,000 year old healing system from India. In an online article based on the book Eat-Taste-Heal www.eattasteheal.com, I found this quote very interesting:

“Much of the wisdom of Ayurvedic nutrition rests on the tip of your tongue, literally!…the sense of taste is a natural guidemap towards proper nutrition.” Not only do our taste buds identify the different tastes of foods; “they unlock the nutritive value of foods and provide the initial spark to the entire digestive process.”

In Ayurveda there are six tastes in which all foods can be categorized: Sweet, Sour, Salty, Bitter, Pungent, and Astringent, with the last two somewhat unfamiliar to many of us. We are all familiar with Sweet (fruit, grains, natural sugars, milk); Sour (sour fruits, yogurt, fermented foods such as sauerkraut); Salty (natural salts, sea veggies); and Bitter (dark leafy greens, herbs and spices).  The two categories less known are Pungent (chili peppers, garlic, herbs and spices); and Astringent (legumes, raw fruits and vegetables, herbs).

Each of these tastes has actions related to keeping the body healthy, from building tissues to stimulating digestion and metabolism, so Ayurveda suggests we attempt to have all the tastes at each meal, which actually is not too difficult if you have a varied diet.

Below is my recipe that I used for the Passover Seder, combining fruits with dark greens, a combination I learned from Victoria Botenko’s book, Green for Life. (Link to my review: http://www.menupause.info/archives/2962). She places leafy greens in a separate vegetable category, not related to carrots, peas and other starchy veggies, so most fruits combine well with the leafy greens, as I did below I emphasized the sweetness and astringency from the fruits and the bitterness from the dark, leafy greens. The other tastes can be emphasized in the main dishes and desserts.

Utensils: Cutting board and knife, bowl for fruit, salad bowl and utensils for serving, strainer
Prep. Time: 20 minutes
Cooking Time: None!
Categories: Vegan, Gluten Free, No Sugar Added

Ingredients (Do not feel limited by my choices)

Approximately 4 cups of fresh, organic fruits, washed, cut and placed in a bowl.
I used>>>

Fruits:

7-8 organic strawberries, washed and sliced to = 2 & 1/2 cups
3-4 clementines, peeled and segments separated
1 organic kiwi, peeled and diced
1/2 small pkg. organic blueberries or blackberries, washed and drained
1/2 org. mango, peeled and sliced and then diced or cut into slivers

Organic Greens: (Washed and drained well or dried in a spinner or with a towel)

One 5oz. pkg. baby lettuces or other dark greens
1 cup baby arugula
1 cup (red-tipped) Romaine lettuce (tear into small pieces)

Directions

1. Placed all fruits (washed, peeled, cut, etc.) in a large bowl and set aside

2.Place all the washed and dried greens in a large serving bowl.

3. Add the cut fruit to the washed & dried greens and toss gently.

4. Serve dressing* in a pitcher and allow each person to use the amount she or he wishes. Feel free to serve more than one type of light dressing, since the fruits are fragile and a light dressing would be best.

*Note: I made a dressing without measuring because I wasn’t sure how it would turn out well. It was actually better than I thought so when I make it again I will post the recipe. For now, here are tentative measurements:

Place one-half cup nut oil in a blender (I used sunflower). Add one or two washed and sliced organic strawberries and and about 1/4 cup orange juice or apple juice. Blend well, chill and serve.

 

 

 

One Response to “Bitter Sweet Spring Salad”

  1. Mary-Lou Meyers Says:

    thanks for the information which I do utilize, each meal begins with the fruit you mentioned,
    followed by a salad, we are soon to have spinach from the garden, and then for the meal itself,
    I try to make the most of our organic vegetables we have frozen from last summer when it was
    a banner tomato year! Thanks for reminding us what our taste buds define for us.

Leave a Reply

Subscribe