All Posts for April 2009

Haroses: Not just for Passover

Monday, April 27th, 2009

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Haroses with raisins

Every Passover I make a dish for the Seder to use as part of the story of Passover. I make the my own haroses (CHa-ro-ses) from apples, walnuts, cinnamon and grape juice or wine, with optional raisins. However, this dish can be made with many other fruits, depending on the Jewish background. For example, haroses can be made with dates, figs, and apricots, because the family making this might be descended from Middle Eastern Jews, whose cuisine consisted of these native fruits.

I love this dish and always wonder why I don’t use it during the year as a topping for my yogurt or as a snack. I think this is because I want it to be a special treat at Passover. But maybe this year I will make it even though it is not Passover. I hope you will want to try it, too, even if you are not Jewish! Keep in mind that the proportions are to your liking: more or less nuts, more or less cinnamon, and most importantly, more or less sweet wine.

Haroses (Chopped Apples, Nuts, and Wine)

Utensils: Cutting board, knife, bowls
Prep. Time: 15-20 minutes
Cooking Time: NONE!
Category: Vegan

Ingredients
6-8 organic apples (I use a variety of apples)
1/2-1 cup coarsely crushed walnuts
1/2-1 cup raisins (optional)
sweet wine or organic grape juice, as needed
cinnamon to taste (non irradiated)

Directions
1. Wash, cut, and core the apples. Grate or chop in a coarse blade in a food processor or grate by hand. Yield will be about 6 cups.
2. Divide the apples in two bowls: 3 cups in each, or whatever your apples yield, divide in half.
3. In one bowl add the raisins, but not the other.
4. In each bowl add walnuts, and then cinnamon to taste, up to 2 tablespoons, if you like cinnamon as I do.
5. In each bowl add enough juice or wine to moisten. Mix well and place in attractive serving bowls.

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Haroses without raisins

Note: I promised that all my April recipes would have some “green,” but since the apples are organic, I still quality this as a green recipe, with green meaning not only green veggies, but also foods food friendly to the earth.

The Daffodil Principle Revisited

Saturday, April 25th, 2009

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In a previous posting two years ago, I wrote about The Daffodil Principle. The story is about a woman who planted one bulb at a time until she had 5 acres of flowers. This year, my college friend Simone sent me a Power Point of this story and it is too lovely not to share.

Just Google The Daffodil Principle and you will have several options. Choose the one with the Power Point presentation for the most effective results.

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