Cotton Dishcloths – Green Living

I have been posting ideas for Earth Day all month on www.menupause.info, but I realize that even those of you who are single or about to be single might be interested in a nice way to be green by knitting cotton dishcloths. When I first moved to Central PA, I found that women knitted their own washcloths.  The pattern was easy, so I started to make them and use them around the house and also give them as house gifts. Below is an article I wrote many years ago, before Earth Day was so big, but now the message seems to be very apropos. If you’ve never knitted, this is an easy pattern for beginners.  Just have someone show you how to knit and also how to increase and decrease this way. Happy green knitting!

ON THE VIRTUE OF COTTON DISHCLOTHS

 

Do you remember when dishes were washed by hand? Sure you do! If not in your mother’s time, then al least in your grandmother’s era.  My mother always used dishcloths. Not until I was married did manufactured sponges appear in my sink.

For awhile, sponges and cloth-like dish rags were “in.” They were small enough or convenient enough to use and then throw away. They fit in with the American way of planned obsolescence. But somewhere in the early 70s I became aware of recycling and the whole movement of back to basics. (I attended the first Earth Day in 1970, so maybe that was the impetus.) Then sponges were “out,” at least in my kitchen.  I purchased the same kind my mother had used, because that was all I knew.

Then I made a marvelous find. I purchased a hand-knit  cotton dishcloth at a school fair where my youngest daughter was a student in Williamsport, PA. This wonderful little dish cloth—too pretty to be called a dish rag!—was soft, colorful, and marvelous to work with…not at all like the stringy ones for sale in the supermarket.

What’s so great about cotton dishcloths? First, you never have to worry if they are still clean, because you can soak them overnight in warm, soapy water or throw them in the laundry after one or two days. They won’t rot, smell or mildew and will soften after each wash. And they will last and last!

One of the parents at the school gave me simple instructions (below). I rummaged around in my attic for my knitting needles, ran off to a local store for some 100% cotton yarn, and I was ready to knit. (Maybe my love of knitting returned with this project.) I make them for myself as well as for friends and even used a variation to make squares for an afghan. (See photo below)

This is not made from cotton, but leftover yarns that are a blend that won’t shrink when washed.

 

 

If an afghan is too ambitious, you can sew about 9 squares together for a pillow, make half a square and crochet ties for a bandana, or make a smaller afghan and use it as a baby gift. The possibilities are numerous.

By now I hope you are hooked on this project as something to keep your hands busy so your heart doesn’t ache so much.  A hobby is a great healer. (I will review a book called Knitting Heaven & Earth next and you will see what I mean.) Below are the directions. Make sure you buy 100% cotton yarn or the washcloths won’t absorb water.

What you will need:

one 4 oz. ball of cotton yarn (Ex. Sugar & Spice)

One size 8 needles (Short, not double pointed)

Crochet hook in case you drop a stitch

Directions:

Cast on 4 stitches and knit them. (All rows are knit, no purling.)

Then, Knit 2, pull the yarn over the needle (YO) and knit to the end of the row. This increases the rows one stitch at a time.

Do the YO at the beginning of each row, until you have increased to 44 stitches. (For a baby’s washcloth, 30 sts. are enough and for a larger one, 50 st. will be good.)

When you reach 44 stitches, you will start to decrease.

Next row: K1, K2 tog., YO, K2 tog.,  K to the end of the row. (Knitting two together just means putting your needle through 2 sts. and then knitting them together.) Again, the decrease is done only at the beginning of each row.

Continue decreasing until you are back to 4 stitches. Then cast off these 4 by knitting the first 2 and pulling the farthest one over the nearest, continuing until only 1 stitch remains. Cut the yarn, leaving a small tail (2 “) and remove the needle so you can pull the 2 inch tail through the last stitch. Anchor it by using the crochet hook to loop it in and out of the washcloth.

If you want a loop to hang the washcloth, leave a 10 inch tail and crochet a chain, and then anchor that to the tip.

Note: For a headscarf, increase until the piece has 75 sts., then decrease and crochet two long chains that you can sew to each end. Great for bad hair days!

P.S. Some people think that these make good pot holders, but they are too thin for that purpose, so please don’t use them for that purpose or you will get burned.

I made this pillow like a giant washcloth, using leftover yarn. However, I did not use yarn over, because I wanted  no design, so I just increased by knitting twice in the same stitch. No squares to sew together!

 

 

 

9 Responses to “Cotton Dishcloths – Green Living”

  1. Paula Buchak Says:

    Creativity is alive and well in PA. Love soft cotton. That’s all I remember from
    eons ago – dishcloths. Beautiful knitting. I can’t believe I made 1 and 1/2 pairs of
    argyle socks in college. I never finished the 4th sock. Made a knitted stole during
    the long Cooper Dining Hall waits.

  2. Ellen Sue Spicer Says:

    I made lots of stuff in college and then abandoned knitting because my mother-in-law was much faster. Went into sewing. Now I do both! es

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  4. ellen sue spicer Says:

    many thx! ellensue

  5. ellen sue spicer Says:

    MAny thanx! ellensue

  6. PATRICIA Says:

    NICE WORK LOOKING FOR THE PATTERN FOR THE ONE YOU BOUGHT AT THE CRAFT FAIR YEARS AGO ITS NOT THE SAME COTTON WE USE NOW LIKE PEACHES AND CEAM IT WAS MORE LIKE A THREAD WHOULD YOU HAVE THE DRIECTIONS FOR THE PINK ONE AND WHAT KIND OF THREAD OR YARN PLEASE EMAIL THANKS PATRICIA

  7. ellen sue spicer Says:

    I only use the pattern I posted. There are some newer cotton yarns in the stores that you can use, but I don’t have the brand names. I would check with an actual yarn shop.
    Thanx, ellensue

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    When someone writes an paragraph he/she maintains
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  9. ellen sue spicer Says:

    thank you, ellensue

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