PETITION FOR REAL FOOD

September 9th, 2018


NOTE:
THIS WILL BE MY LAST POSTING FOR 10 DAYS. I AM TAKING
THE 10 DAYS BETWEEN ROSH HOSHANA AND YOM KIPPOR, THE DAYS OF AWE, AS A RESPITE FROM POSTING AND RETHINKING WHERE I WANT MY WRITING TO GO NEXT
.  Happy New Year/Shana Tova to Jewish readers.

 

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN TO PETITION BELOW. I CANNOT MOVE IT UP.

 

THANX TO MY FRIEND HONEY FOR SENDING THIS. It will bleed into the margin.

Sign the petition: It’s time for food service companies to choose Real Food, not Big Food.

Three companies — Aramark, Sodexo, and Compass Group — serve billions of meals every year in cafeterias at schools, hospitals, universities, and businesses.

The vast majority of the food they serve comes from multinational corporations and factory farms that are harming the health of our communities and polluting the planet.

If these companies shifted to serving food that is good for people and the planet, it would make a huge impact. We need your help to urge them to act!

Tell Aramark, Sodexo and Compass Group: Stop fueling environmental destruction through your food purchasing!

Aramark, Sodexo, and Compass Group are lining the pockets of “Big Food” corporations like Tyson. These “Big Food” companies produce pesticide-intensive, GMO-fed, factory-farmed meat.

This is incredibly destructive for our environment. Factory farming pollutes water and contributes to climate chaos. Pesticides poison people and are leading to the decline of bees and monarch butterflies. And it’s all so Big Ag can make bigger profits.

What’s more, this system shuts out organic farmers, sustainable producers, and farmers of color. It’s unjust and it’s harming our health and the planet.

But these three food service giants could change that. They could reorient their business model away from a system of exclusive relationships with Big Food companies and towards Real Meals that support sustainable producers, communities, and the planet.

Sign the petition: It’s time for food service companies to choose Real Food, not Big Food.

Meat and dairy consumption is heating up the planet. And these food service companies are not being held accountable. Instead, they’re driving climate chaos by purchasing meat from polluting and inhumane factory farms.

We need to send the message that the public wants a food system that supports local and sustainable farmers, invests in racial justice and equity, and preserves our planet for future generations. But we can’t do this without you.

Tell Aramark, Sodexo, and Compass Group: Support sustainable farmers and ranchers instead of factory farms!

Thank you for joining us in calling for Real Meals.

In solidarity,
Chloe Waterman,
Senior food campaigner,
Friends of the Earth

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Sue Grafton’s Kinsey and Me Stories

September 5th, 2018

This month the local mystery group is meeting to discuss Sue Grafton’s books. I hope to attend and to that end I have been reading and re-reading her alphabet mysteries: A is for Alibi, B  is for Burglar, etc. until Y is for Yesterday. Sadly, Grafton died before she could complete the final books in her alphabet series. In fact, she died less than one year ago, in December of 2017, having succumbed to cancer. She was 77. (We are contemporaries.)

While browsing in the library, I came across a book I had not seen, called Kinsey and Me stories, published in 2013. Part one features detective stories starring her alter-ego Kinsey Millhone, P.I., a character that I feel I know personally from reading so many of her books.

Writing a mystery in 3 or 4 pages is no small feat, but Grafton is good at her craft as a writer, so her stories are enjoyable and interesting. Solving a crime is so short a time on paper is not easy!

In her story “long gone,” she writes about September in Santa Teresa, the town she uses in her novels, which may just be where she lived in Montecito, CA. The first paragraph of that story seems to echo my own feelings about September. Here it is as a direct quote:

“September in Santa Teresa. I’ve never known anyone yet who doesn’t suffer a certain restlessness when autumn rolls around. It’s the season of new school clothes, fresh notebooks, and finely sharpened pencils without any teethmarks in the wood. We’re all eight year olds again and anything is possible. The new year should never begin on January 1. It begins in the fall and our lunch boxes have no dents.”

Actually, this example is one of the reasons I love her books. She writes about real people and real feelings. I would have liked to know her and I miss knowing she will not write any more books.

The second part of the book, “Me,” is not easy reading, because it is really a mini-memoir of growing up with alcoholic parents and writing about all the pain of seeing her mother slowly die, although she uses Kit Blue as the storyteller. She writes about her mother’s  suicide when Sue at the end of her teens, and of course, it affected her work and her personal life. Like Kinsey, she was divorced twice and I think her childhood may have influenced her issues with close relationships. One of “stories” in this section is called “The Closet” and Grafton writes all about the contents of her mother’s room. It sounds as though it might be boring, but the author has a way with words that you can only really appreciate after reading several of her stories or books.

The last “story” in the second half is called “a letter from my father,” and it is very moving. I cried as I was reading it, because she writes how painful it is as she notes: ” The letter is the story of your life, all the stuff of which you are made….” writing in the third person, as Kit Blue, perhaps on purpose to remove herself from the pain of the words.

If you have never read Sue Grafton, this book is a good place to start, because you read her work as well as information about her life. And having read her difficult early life I have even more admiration for her, because she was able to work through her feelings through her novels, making them excellent reading because they are full of feelings many of us never discuss.

Kinsey and Me Stories is published by G.P. Putnam’s Sons, NY, 2013

Internet photo of Sue Grafton. She had a great smile!

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